Sophie Bouy Soda Fired Sake Cup

Sold out
  • Sophie Bouy Soda Fired Sake Cup

Sophie Bouy Soda Fired Sake Cup

Sold out

Handcrafted by Sophie Bouy, A Vancouver based ceramic artist.

More on Soda Firing: 

Soda firing is a close cousin to salt firing which, as far as we know, dates back to 13th C Germany. When salt was introduced in a hot kiln, it would vaporize and form a glaze as it landed on the pots. You’ve probably seen old jugs and tankards with a mostly grey glaze and blue decorations. Those would have been salt glazed in a wood kiln. During the 70s, as potters looked for an alternative to salt, they discovered that soda ash and sodium bicarbonate would create a similar glaze when introduced in the kiln at high temperature.

The kiln we use at Shadbolt is gas-fired. Once it reaches 2350°F, a mixture of soda ash/sodium bicarbonate and water is introduced into the kiln. The glaze is formed as the soda vaporizes and mixes with the silica and alumina in the clay. The glaze itself is colourless but the final colour of the pot varies depending on the type of clay that was used and how much soda landed on it. Sometimes, a thin layered of clay with added cobalt oxide is sprayed on the pot before firing, giving the pots a deep blue colour with an orange peel texture. Other oxides are also used to give the pots a yellow or green finish.

The end results of soda firing are somewhat unpredictable so each pot is one-of-a-kind and make this process very exciting.

https://www.sophiebouyceramics.com/

 

  • Gallery
  • Description

Handcrafted by Sophie Bouy, A Vancouver based ceramic artist.

More on Soda Firing: 

Soda firing is a close cousin to salt firing which, as far as we know, dates back to 13th C Germany. When salt was introduced in a hot kiln, it would vaporize and form a glaze as it landed on the pots. You’ve probably seen old jugs and tankards with a mostly grey glaze and blue decorations. Those would have been salt glazed in a wood kiln. During the 70s, as potters looked for an alternative to salt, they discovered that soda ash and sodium bicarbonate would create a similar glaze when introduced in the kiln at high temperature.

The kiln we use at Shadbolt is gas-fired. Once it reaches 2350°F, a mixture of soda ash/sodium bicarbonate and water is introduced into the kiln. The glaze is formed as the soda vaporizes and mixes with the silica and alumina in the clay. The glaze itself is colourless but the final colour of the pot varies depending on the type of clay that was used and how much soda landed on it. Sometimes, a thin layered of clay with added cobalt oxide is sprayed on the pot before firing, giving the pots a deep blue colour with an orange peel texture. Other oxides are also used to give the pots a yellow or green finish.

The end results of soda firing are somewhat unpredictable so each pot is one-of-a-kind and make this process very exciting.

https://www.sophiebouyceramics.com/